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    Adelphoi's Roots Playlists on LBB

    ROOTS VOLUME 21

    Now into its fifth year and the 21st edition. For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe of unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    Some of the highlights this time round include:

    Leo Nocentelli - Give Me Back 

    This is a special one! For many years the tape this track comes from was thought to be lost, left behind by Leo Nocentelli as he left New Orleans for LA in the 70s, and later assumed to be destroyed in the wreckage left by hurricane Katrina. In 2018, however, the crate digger and Beastie Boys affiliate, Mike Nishita, picked up a collection of tapes salvaged from the floods and realised that amongst it was a tape of demos, constituting the only known solo recording of one of funk’s greatest guitarists. Leo Nocentelli was the legendary guitarist of New Orleans funk band The Meters, who in the 70s warmed up for The Rolling Stones and were once asked to play a private set for Led Zeppelin. In 1971, between record deals, Nocentelli recorded a tape of demos he’d initially written for other artists before deciding to record them himself. The tape found a sweet spot between the folk-soul sound of Bill Withers and Terry Callier, and the country-and-western funk of James Taylor, but was never released until this year. It has been lovingly released by Light In The Attic, who also crafted this video which tells the story.


    The Diddys - Intergalactic Love Songs

    This cosmic funk number was initially released on The Diddys’ and Paige Douglas’ only album, Agony And Ecstasy in 1977, before being reissued by Mukatsuku and Kickin records in 2015 and 2016 respectively. Applying the cosmic synth sounds associated with early library music luminaries like Brian Bennett and sci-fi movies of the time, with an uptempo but utterly laid back funk backbeat, its twin themes of space and sex exist firmly in the world of afrofuturist funk luminary, George Clinton, and his bands Parliament and Funkadelic. 

    Susan Cadogan - Do It Baby

    Growing up in St Andrews, Jamaica in the 50s and 60s, Susan Cadogan was highly influenced by US import records by Gladys Knight, The Supremes, and The Platters. While recording her first single, Love Of My Life, at the late legend Lee Scratch Perry’s Black Ark studio, Perry asked her to record a cover of the Millie Jackson song, Hurt So Good. Despite low sales in Jamaica, it became a classic among DJs in the UK. Do It Baby, released the same year is a sweet and sultry number with Cadogans languid soprano lilting against an energetic rockers beat.

    Ike Turner & The Kings of Rhythm - Funky Mule

    Ike Turner for good reason is not remembered fondly by history, but the contribution of The Kings of Rhythm to the development of rhythmic dance music is indisputable. Funky Mule was released as an album track 1969 on the instrumental album, A Black Man’s Soul, but it would become far more important than the album’s singles, due to the intro drum break recorded by Mack Johnson, which became a foundational breakbeat in jungle and drum & bass. The incredibly intimidating list of artists that sampled Funky Mule include luminaries such as Goldie, Photek, Source Direct, Aphex Twin (as The Tuss), and Fatboy Slim.


    Lady Blackbird - Blackbird

    One of the new pieces in the playlist, Lady Blackbird’s cover of Nina Simone’s stirring civil rights anthem put her on the map last year, and she was quickly signed to BMG. Her debut album, Black Acid Soul, is a powerful composite of a constellation of influences from the history of Black American music. Recorded in Prince’s studio at Sunset Sound, it features Deron Johnson, Miles Davis’ pianist, and is influenced by Billie Holiday, Gladys Knight, Tina Turner and Chaka Khan.


    Yoshio Chin Suzuki - The Mirage

    This stunning closing track finishes Suzuki’s stunning 1984 album, Morning Picture, which moves between solely ambient cuts in the New Age minimalist tradition that Japan was a hotbed for in the 70s and 80s, with city pop cuts indebted to European synth pop and hints of jazz funk. This track features a fascinating use of the Roland TR-808 drum machine, which at the time was laying the foundations for house music: at once pacey and atmospheric, Suzuki eschews the snares and kicks that the machine is famous for, opting for the sparse and unobtrusive cowbell and rim sounds.  

    These are just some of the highlights in what I hope is an enjoyable musical journey that spans across continents, generations and genres…

    A huge thanks goes out to labels such as Now Again, Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, Analog Africa, Music From Memory, Africa Seven, Far Out Recordings, Strut, Mr Bongo and Soundway, who continue to unearth some of the most unique and amazing music that may have otherwise never seen the light of day.



    ROOTS VOLUME XX

    Now into its fifth year and the 20th edition. For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe of unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    Some of the highlights this time round include:

    Ron Everett

    Ron Everett’s private press masterpiece, Glitter in the City, remained the stuff of local legend in his native Philadelphia until a recent reissue by Jazzman Records. Spoken of in hushed tones by local collectors, but scattered across the world in a handful of copies pressed onto anonymous black wax in plain sleeves, its blend of funky, sweet and soulful jazz is finally available for us all to hear.

    Mballa Bony

    There’s little information to be found on Cameroonian funk guitarist and singer Mballa Bony. Despite a prolific slew of albums and singles, the majority of his discography is obscure in origin and hard to date except for his eponymous album Bonnie. B-side cut Mezik Me Mema, from an earlier 7 inch resurfaces on Analog Africa's various artists compilation Cameroonian garage funk.

    Common

    Common’s album released last month Beautiful Revolution Part Two was created ‘with hope and inspiration in mind.’ Tapping into a long-standing tradition of optimistic futurism in black American music, Common tells us ‘the spirit of the album was meant to emulate what a great today would sound and feel like”. When We Move features The Roots’ Black Thought and saxophonist Seun Kuti, youngest son of Nigerian Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti.

    Disco Vumbi

    Disco Vumbi is an alias of Kenyan musician Alai K. Emerging from the 90s hip-hop collective Ukoo Flani, he’s gone on to release a handful of acclaimed EPs on the incredible Nyege Nyege Tapes, whose festival of the same name brings together the cutting edge of African experimental dance music each year, along with Slikback’s Hakuna Kulala imprint. The new album draws on Benga electro and the local stories of Alai’s native Magongo.

    These are just some of the highlights in what I hope is an enjoyable musical journey that spans across continents, generations and genres…

    A huge thanks goes out to labels such as Now Again, Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, Analog Africa, Music From Memory, Africa Seven, Far Out Recordings, Strut, Mr Bongo and Soundway, who continue to unearth some of the most unique and amazing music that may have otherwise never seen the light of day.



    ROOTS VOLUME XIX

    Now into its fifth year and the 19th edition. For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe of unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    Some of the highlights this time round include:

    Toumani Diabaté & London Symphony Orchestra - Mamadou Kanda Keita

    This new piece from the legendary Malian kora player sees him further exploring joining the dots between traditional kora playing and western classical instrumentation, in collaboration with the London Symphony Orchestra. One of the most prominent Malian musicians of the last 30+ years, Toumani Diabaté hails from something of a musical dynasty.

    From his earliest album featuring Pentangle upright bassist Danny Thompson and the flamenco group Ketama, his career has been characterised by fruitful collaborations and cross-cultural pollinations. The move towards orchestral music was prefaced by a musical conversation with Ludovico Einaudi, which began in the early noughties.

    The Vibrettes - Humpty Dump

    A one-off release on the California label Lujon Records, The Vibrette’s Humpty Dump is something of an obscurity. Issued in 1973 across both sides of a 7”, it’s the only known release from the band, who remain shrouded in mystery.
    Despite this obscurity it’s a tight and brilliant slice of breakbeat funk with a sparse and powerful bassline and euphoric call and response vocals. The drum solo that opens the track would later become an important breakbeat for dance music producers, sampled by Fatboy Slim, Aphex Twin, Manix, Ray Keith, and many others.

    The Revolutionaries - Kunta Kinte Dub

    The Revolutionaries were the house band of the legendary Channel One Studios in Kingston, Jamaica. The band was behind the scenes in recording sessions for many of the major players in Reggae in the latter half of the 70s, appearing on albums by BB Seaton, Black Uhuru, Culture, Gregory Isaacs, John Holt, The Heptones, Tapper Zukie, and even Serge Gainsbourg.

    Kunta Kinte Dub, recorded in 1976, was named after a character in Alex Haley’s novel of the same year, Roots: The Saga of an American Family, based on a Gambian ancestor of Haley who was enslaved and brought to America in the late 18th century. With its mysterious synth melody, driving bassline, and incredible sense of space, it quickly became a staple of reggae selectors from Kingston to Brixton and remains one of the genre’s most iconic instrumentals.

    Sister Rosetta Tharpe - That’s All

    Known to some as ‘the original soul sister’ and ‘the Godmother of rock-and-roll’, Sister Rosetta Tharpe was the first great recording star of gospel music and helped bring the genre to  rhythm-and-blues and rock-and-roll audiences, as well as an innovator in the use of heavy distortion on her electric guitar. She was a key and underappreciated influence on the likes of Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Johnny Cash, and Elvis Presley - and during a 1964 gig in Manchester, with Muddy Waters, went on to inspire a new wave of British guitarists including Eric Clapton and Keith Richards.

    Pressed onto a 10” shellac in 1938, That’s All is one of Tharpe’s earliest recordings but already showcases her fiery picking technique and bombastic vocal delivery.

    A Certain Ratio - Lucinda

    Appearing on the Manchester band’s third album, Sextet, released on Tony WIlson and Alan Erasmus’ iconic Factory Records, Lucinda sees A Certain Ratio proudly wearing their disco influences on their sleeves. The intro’s sparse bassline, spacious guitar tone and moody vocals set the tone in pure post-punk fashion, before breaking into a groovy, driving duel of bass and jangling guitar funk.

    Reminiscent of the fertile late 70s no wave scene in New York, where disco and punk melded into hybrid forms, Lucinda highlights the comfortable cross-pollination of these seemingly disparate genres.

    These are just some of the highlights in what I hope is an enjoyable musical journey that spans across continents, generations and genres…

    A huge thanks goes out to labels such as Now Again, Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, Analog Africa, Music From Memory, Africa Seven, Far Out Recordings, Strut, Mr Bongo and Soundway, who continue to unearth some of the most unique and amazing music that may have otherwise never seen the light of day.


    ROOTS VOLUME XVIII

    Now into its fifth year and the 18th edition. For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe of unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    Some of the highlights this time round include:


    Freddie King - Going Down

    Going Down was originally written by the Tennessee saxophonist, Don Nix, who amongst over 400 record credits was a member of The Mar-Keys, a Memphis rhythm & blues group whose rhythm section would later evolve into Booker T & The MGs. The definitive recording though, has to be Freddie King’s. Known as one of the ‘three kings’ of blues, along with BB and Albert King. Double-time Chicago blues piano chords sit above a chugging backbeat and ever descending bassline, while screaming fuzz guitar leads counterpoint King’s gravelly vocal.

    Co-Real Artists - What About You (In The World Today)

    Written by Genie Jackson and recorded by Gordon Jackson, Anthony Green, Denise Jackson, and the Co-Real Artists, this bit of bonafide music history first surfaced tucked away on the B-side of a mawkish down-tempo soul jam called Love Is The Thing in 1974. Five years before Sugarhill Gang’s Rapper’s Delight and The Fatback Band’s King Tim III (which is sometimes held to be a challenger to Rapper’s Delight’s title as the first hip hop track), the Co-Real Artists paired an uptempo breakbeat funk beat with proto-rap vocals, pre-empting both hip-hop and the break-led ‘drumapellas’ of Baltimore and Jersey club records of the 90s.

    Yu Su - Xiu

    Rising to prominence amongst the new age revivalism of the ‘Vancouver riviera’ scene towards the middle of the last decade, during the height of labels like Mood Hut and 1080p, the Chinese-Canadian artist has since carved out a niche incorporating Chinese traditional sounds into the neo-balearic aesthetic of her home city. Her new album for Beijing label, bié Records, wears this influence on its sleeve, with the title Yellow River Blue alluding to the Yellow River, which flows alongside her birthplace, Keifang, in the country’s Henan province. Xiu rolls at an uptempo pace, referencing the Asian-American dialogue in c20th minimalism, 80s new wave stylings and the new age mysticism of early trance.

    Atomic Forest - Spectrum

    Spectrum was initially released on the 1981 album Disco Roar, attributed to Keith Kanga, bassist and manager of the Indian psych-rock / funk group Atomic Forest, but in fact the work of the whole band. The issue was thankfully rectified with a 2019 reissue by Now Again Records. A phenomenal bit of fuzz-driven breakbeat funk, Spectrum build around a relentlessly driving bass riff with a tight brass section juxtaposed against noodling, improvisational guitar leads and drum fills that fire off periodically, threatening to swallow the groove but always snapping back into perfect time.

    Mr Fingers - Electronic Debris

    Larry Heard should need no introduction. Credited as the founder of deep house and producer of the legendary Martin Luther King sampling ‘86 record Can You Feel It, as well as the tracky, acidic leftfield drum tracks of the late 80s under the Gherkin Jerks moniker, Heard has been on the forefront of a number of developments in house music over the decades. Electronic Debris, a cut from his new record on his own label, Alleviated Records, finds him in his element, a banging, jackin’ drum track underpinned by a formidable acid bassline, but nevertheless counterpointed by lush, wistful jazz chords reminiscent of the dawn rising over parties of old.

    Mindy Meng Wang, Tim Shiel - Sleeping Tiger on the Bund

    In response to Covid-19 lockdowns in the last year, Melbourne’s Music in Exile label, a not-for-profit aimed at profiling local musicians from refugee and migrant backgrounds, began its Building Bridges series, setting up creative collaborations between musicians from different backgrounds and traditions. This release from Australian-Chinese avant-garde composer, Mindy Meng Wang, and Melbourne producer Tim Shiel was put together remotely, Mindy sending recorded compositions performed on her 21-string guzheng to Tim, to be reworked into a glitchy dancefloor focused, 80s referencing house track.

    The Psychedelic Aliens - Okponmo Ni Tsitsi Emo Le

    The spectacularly named and sadly short-lived Psychedelic Aliens hailed from Ghana, recording a small handful of singles, including a couple of 7’s under the name The Magic Aliens, between forming in 1969 and disbanding in ‘71. Their entire catalogue  A ferocious battery of scuzzy overdriven guitar, nagging psych organs and rolling west African percussion, Okponmo Ni Tsitsi Emo Le is a pacey improvisational jam held together by repeated guitar licks and primed for manic dancefloors.

    A huge thanks goes out to labels such as Now Again, Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, Analog Africa, Music From Memory, Africa Seven, Far Out Recordings, Strut, Mr Bongo and Soundway, who continue to unearth some of the most unique and amazing music that may have otherwise never seen the light of day.



    ROOTS VOLUME XVII

    Now into its fifth year and the 17th edition. For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe of unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    Some of the highlights this time round include:

    J.M. Tim & Foty - Douala By Night
    This stomping, high energy disco number closes the Cameroonian duo’s eponymous debut album from 1977. While the track is firmly grounded by its earth-shaking bassline and exquisitely tight groove, each element of the instrumentation slotting neatly into the rhythmic picture, its most distinctive feature is the ethereal vocals, which soar above in an echoing falsetto. If someone sampled this they are likely to have a huge hit!

    African Soul Band - Nande
    This is a rare jewel indeed! A private press originally released in France 1978 that has recently been reissued thanks to the label Africa Seven. An obscure afro disco soul track that fuses western orchestral string arrangements with Senegalese vocals and marimbas.

    Common - Say Peace
    The Chicago hip hop legend needs no introduction. Featuring PJ and The Roots’ Black thought, ‘Say Peace’ comes from his new album A Beautiful Revolution Pt. 1. Common has never shied away from the social justice focus of ‘conscious rap’, but this album speaks directly to the current political moment in the US. He says, ‘A Beautiful Revolution Pt. 1 is affirmation. It’s recognition. It’s elevation. It’s music to go with a movement. Because the truth is, there is still so much work to do.’

    Witch - Erotic Delight
    Witch made a name for themselves in the mid-70s as the first Zambian band to record and release a commercial album. For the next decade they pushed their psychedelic garage rock sound into ever expanding territories, fusing elements picked up from avid listening to American FM radio and incorporating boogie, low slung rock ballads, and pushing Patrick Mwondela’s synth work and electronic production to the fore. The swinging chug of ‘Erotic Delight’ introduces Kuomboka, released in 1984, which showcased their Zambian roots more than any before and would prove to be their final record as the pressures of the music industry and growing instability in the region became too much for the band.

    Sonny Boy Williamson I - Mellow Chick Swing
    John Lee Curtis Williamson was a Tennessee-born Chicago blues player referred to as ‘the father of modern blues harp.’ Recording from 1937 until his death by mugging in South Side, Chicago, in 1948, his catalogue has at times been confused with another Sonny Boy Williamson, by the real name of Aleck Miller, who had begun playing and recording in Mississippi before Williamson’s death, but who’s own period of activity stretched from 1951-1965. Mellow chick swing, released on a 10” shellac by RCA Victor in 1947, is a swinging uptempo blues track, featuring alternately soloing guitar, harmonica, and voice, underpinned by a driving rhythmic piano. 

    Eliana Pittman - Quem Vai Querer
    By the time Eliana Pittman’s Quem Vai Querer album was released in 1977, the Brazilian singer had already released twelve solo albums, including her 1963 debut, a collaboration with her father, the American jazz alto saxophonist, who had previously recorded in the bands of Bennie Moten and Count Basie. It’s title track is an uplifting, high energy samba-MPB track with rolling, funky drums building to a climax of intensity with the addition of chorus vocals and staccato rhythm guitar.

    Omar Khorshed - Rakset El Fadaa
    The great Egyptian guitarist, Omar Khorshed, taught himself violin, guitar, and piano as a child and in his early twenties formed the band Les Petits Chats, influenced by Western popular music. After being forced to leave Egypt due to political unrest, he spent the years 1973-77 in Beirut, recording solo albums for Lebanese labels, Voice of the Orient and Voice of Lebanon. ‘Rakset El Fadaa’, the opener to his 1974 album, Rhythms from the Orient, is a psychedelic, electrified guitar piece dueling with polyrhythmic percussion and electronic organ.

    David Axelrod - Songs of Innocence
    Despite being sampled by DJ Shadow, De La Soul, Lauryn Hill to Dr Dre, David Axlerod still remains relatively unknown to the general populous. He combined heavily microphoned drums and baroque orchestration, and avant garde themes fused with elements of jazz, rock, and R&B.

    A huge thanks goes out to labels such as Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, Analog Africa, Music From Memory, Africa Seven, Far Out Recordings, Strut, Mr Bongo and Soundway, who continue to unearth some of the most unique and amazing music that may have otherwise never seen the light of day.


    ROOTS VOLUME XVI

    Jonathan Watts returns with a sixteenth instalment of music with roots in Africa.

    For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe from the unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    We open on the mellow and lo-fi tones of Melbourne based duo, Acidslop. The band and label have highlighted that this record was created on stolen land of the Wurundjeri people. They acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land, who today still continue to survive genocide. Through this ep the band have raised awareness of the Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance (WAR), a collective of young Aboriginal people committed to the cause of decolonisation and the philosophy of Aboriginal nationalism - resistance and revival.

    The vocals from Bessie Jones’ ‘Sometimes’, recorded in 1960, might sound recognisable to those familiar with Moby’s ‘Honey’, but if it wasn’t for the culture of sampling many may not have become acquainted with Bessie Jones’ vocals. It’s music like this that illustrates how so much amazing music often gets overlooked, but inspires and influences major recording artists. Jones felt a need to preserve African-American history through song and dance, and in 1961 she travelled to New York City to record her biography and body of music. The recordings are preserved in the Alan Lomax archive.

    On The Corner Records are back with a fresh track for summer 2020, Ugugu lifted from the ‘Son Of Sun’ EP from Morroccan producer Guedra Guedra. It’s a euphoric, high-energy, future dance sound demonstrating the rich product of North Africa’s fertile club scene. 

    A favourite curveball selection for house and techno DJs, ‘Stebeni’s Theme’ appears on the 1981 debut album from Bonjo Iyabinghi Noah and Adrian Sherwood’s psychedelic dub outfit, African Head Charge. The group’s truly global revolving line up has included the likes of Skip McDonald and Jah Wobble, and its heavy percussive sound draws influence from across the spectrum of dub, nyabinghi and post-punk, filtered through Sherwood’s relentlessly experimental production style. 

    Curtis Mayfield’s ‘Right On For The Darkness’ appears on the B-side to 1974’s single ‘Kung Fu’, as a conscious breakbeat funk track with lyrics about greed and inequality, and replete with wah wah guitar, symphonic strings, and Mayfield’s trademark falsetto. This cover by Willie Wright, released in the same year, strips back the orchestration and ramps up the melancholy, his deeper voice backed by a heavy drum workout and duelling flute and guitar, recalling the collaborative work of Brian Jackson and Gil Scott-Heron.

    Virna Lindt’s debut album, ‘Shiver’, released in 1983 by the Compact Organisation, combined the ethereal cold wave sensibilities of the period with a thematic and aesthetic recollection of 1960s cold war spy thrillers and the lounge jazz, rock and roll crossover sound of James Bond composer, John Barry. ‘Underwater Boy’ layers a low slung rock and roll rhythm section with smooth jazz harmonies and dubwise production that evokes images of Sean Connery in a diving suit floating around a submarine.

    The octogenarian saxophonist and professor of music, Archie Shepp, has been at the forefront of avant-garde jazz since the early 60s, with a hand in the development of innumerable subgenres, including free jazz and jazz-funk. ‘The Fifth of May’, released in 1987, combined Shepp’s free flying saxophone work with electronics and ‘Fourth World’ instrumentation by the Dutch keyboardist, band leader and teacher Jasper Van ’t Hof. ‘Pulse of the Roots’ opens with thumb piano and sedate piano, layering the instrumentation into a blissful new age climax, led by Shepp’s soaring saxophone.

    There are so many more to mention, but I will let the music do the talking in this seemingly endless journey of timeless music that has gone under the radar for the many!


    ROOTS VOLUME XV

    Jonathan Watts returns with a fifteenth instalment of music with roots in Africa

    For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe from the unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    We open with an Afrobeat belter inspired by the sounds of Fela Kuti. Little is known about the artist ‘Inflo’ aka Dean Josiah, other than he’s produced for Michael Kiwankua, Celo Sol and Little Simz. He is one part of the elusive trio SAULT and have included their track ‘Masterpiece’ within this playlist too.

    ‘Sam’, a psychedelic, bluesy folk track from the obscure band Quiet World features  pre-Genesis Steve Hackett. The track Sam originally released as a single in 1971 has been reissued as part of their concept album ‘Road’. 

    ‘Oboe’, an hypnotic, blissed-out, easy on the ear, reggae/funk tune, originally released in 1980 though Studio One on the 'Showcase' album, has been recently reissued as a single for the first time ever via the legendary Soul Jazz Records. It was written by Jackie Mitto, known as ‘the keyboard king’ and founding member of the reggae band the Skatalites. He was also a prolific songwriter who played and served as a musical director on virtually every record that came out of the famous Studio One recording studios in Kingston, Jamaica. 

    Jackie Mitto may not be so much a household name generally, but he is so highly regarded within Reggae circles that upon hearing of his death, Coxsone Dodd, a Jamaican record producer who was influential in the development of ska and reggae in the 1950s, 1960s and beyond, expressed his high admiration; "He was an ambassador of our music worldwide... there can be no doubt. Read the legacy this young man has left behind. May his name be remembered and his music live on."

    Staying with reggae, but moving into more ‘lovers rock’ territory is a track by beatmaker Budgie, that sounds like it came out 30-40 odd years ago - maybe because in part it did, with a sample from Ruddy Thomas and Susan Cadogan (You Know How to Make Me) Feel So Good.

    Bringing things up to date to the sounds of now, is up and coming artist Sir Was with a track lifted from his second LP ‘Holding On To A Dream’. Lofi hip hop beats, dubwise effects, and dream pop textures abound on this collaboration with Little Dragon. I sense we will be hearing more of Sir Was over the next coming years.

    Khruangbin, perhaps not so obscure as they’re now playing on the festival circuit and receiving the plaudits they deserve, are back with a brand new soul, funk track ‘Time (You and I)’ from their forthcoming album ‘Mordechai’ set to be released in June 2020. Aside from showcasing the influence African music has had on our world the album shares the spirit and ethos of this playlist of having no prejudice towards any country or style; Khruangbin’s new LP draws influences from Pakistan, Korea and West Africa, as well as “incorporating strains of Indian chanting boxes and Congolese syncopated guitar”.

    Segun Adewale, the ‘crown prince’ of juju music, developed the sound known as yo-pop with his 1986 record ‘Ojo Je’, including this hypnotic, swung funk number ‘Atewo-Lara Ka Tepo Mo’Se’. It’s received an edit treatment for contemporary dance floors in recent years, from Ben Gomori, released on Sterns Edits, but the original is a gently driving seven-minute epic replete with repetitive vocal hooks and psychedelic guitar licks.

    The Charmels’ low slung R&B ballad, ‘As Long as I’ve got You’, opens with a trilling piano line recognisable instantly to any hip hop fan. Released in 1967 and written by Isaac Hayes and David Porter, this track exemplifies the melancholic Memphis soul sound that was to be a profound influence on RZA’s productions and the sound of Wu Tang Clan. Although he was beaten to it by the obscure rap-rock band Smokin’ Suckaz Wit Logic, whose ‘Gangsta Story’ was released about a week before, it was Wu Tang’s ‘C.R.E.A.M.’ that catapulted this off-kilter piano lick into enduring public consciousness.

    ‘Mu Africa’ is a heavy, driving bit of Kenyan funk written by Lawrence Nduru and recorded with the Rift Valley Brothers. Not much is known about this group who released around fifteen undated 7” singles around the late 70s, but this track is led by bluesy guitar riffs and vocal hooks, underpinned by propulsive breakbeats and a relentlessly percussive rhythm guitar run through a wah wah pedal.

    ‘It’s My Turn’ was released on Connecticut rapper Stezo’s first and only LP, ‘Crazy Noise’ and as the B-Side to his single, ‘To The Max’. Featuring some unsettling string stabs, massive swinging drum breaks and a sliding bassline that drips with funk, this is a timelessly  enduring piece of late 80s hip hop.

    Southern jazz pianist Mary Lou Williams learned piano as a young child in the 1910s, sitting on musicians’ laps to reach the keys, a musical upbringing she received growing up in a ‘shotgun shack’, a local music venue. She began her career playing for tips at gambling joints after moving with her family to Pittsburgh. With a career lasting until the late 70s she saw and participated in many of the twists and turns and shifts in direction jazz took over the 20th century. ‘A Grand Night For Swinging’ was recorded in New York and released in 1964 on her own label, Mary Records, in conjunction with Moses Asch with Marian Distler’s legendary Folkways Records.

    Colombian sisters Elia y Elizabeth grew up in a musical family, grandchildren to the renowned Spanish tenor Miguel Fleta. Their work with Bogota bohemian and jazz musician Jimmy Salcedo in the early 70s led to two successful LPs and burgeoning acclaim in their home country, but their music slipped into relative obscurity after Elia’s decision to leave touring, to focus on university studies in music teaching.

    Once again a special thanks goes out to labels such as Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, NowAgain, Analog Africa, Music From Memory, Far Out Recordings, Strut, Mr Bongo and Soundway, who continue to unearth some amazing music that may have otherwise never seen the light of day.

    I hope you enjoy the journey.


    ROOTS - BEST OF

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts returns, taking us on another eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa.

    Now into its fifth year, I felt it was time to consolidate and showcase some of the highlights over the last five years. For the uninitiated the Roots playlist showcases an eclectic range of music from across the globe of unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    There are many reasons why a lot of music has been overlooked. The award-winning film 'Searching for Sugar Man' certainly illustrates how an artist can be overlooked, even when the talent is up there with such greats as Bob Dylan.

    A great example of a later-discovered track is the unreleased demo recording of Prince’s ‘17 Days’. It was recorded in one take with just a microphone and piano. The track was eventually re-recorded and ended up as a funk tune, but it's nice to hear the original idea in a stripped-back form.

    How was Jack Jacobs’ ‘I Believe It’s Alright’ not a hit in 1971?! Melodies International reissued it in 2019 - a truly uplifting song!

    ‘I Love You’ - East of Underground. With only a handful of original copies known to exist, East Of Underground was reissued for the first time ever by Wax Poetics Records in 2007. The song ‘I Love You’ was still relatively unknown until 21 Savage sampled it on 2018's ‘a lot’. This track highlights how the culture of sourcing and unearthing rarities can have a huge impact on modern commercial music.

    A special thanks goes out to labels such as Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, Analog Africa, Music From Memory, Far Out Recordings, Strut, Mr Bongo and Soundway, who continue to unearth some amazing music that may have otherwise never seen the light of day.


    ROOTS VOLUME XIV

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts returns, taking us on another eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa.

    This playlist has been curated to showcase songs that are equally alluring as challenging, that have slipped under the radar of mass appeal, but still have had an indirect impact on modern music. It’s a melting pot of hip hop, jazz, cumbia, rock, psychedelic, funk, house, folk, bossa and highlife stretching the corners of the globe from Algeria to Colombia. 

    Opening the playlist and finding the balance by not going too obscure is Brenton Woods’ 1967 ‘The Oogum Boogum Song’ which despite charting 34 in the US and top 9 in the Canadian RnB charts, and recently being featuring in the soundtrack of the film ‘Devil's Due’, still remains relatively on the periphery, globally.

    From Motown-influenced Northern Soul from Philly Queen Dee Dee Sharp comes one of her finest; 'I Really Love You’ is brimming with a smooth, shimmering soulful sound. She didn't get the same kind of recognition that her Motown and Stax contemporaries did, with this single only reaching 78 in the US singles chart.

    Going deeper into obscurity is 'Nantucket Island' lifted from Willie Wright's 1977 'Telling The Truth’ LP. An obscure soul singer with a listenable assimilation of soul, pop, rock, and folk. His refusal to cleave to one particular genre may have perhaps hindered Wright's commercial prospects throughout his career.

    Moving forward into 2019 is an artist to watch out for, Bakar. Bakar’s soulful and vintage-sounding ‘Hell N Back’ has a sense of modernity with his vocal delivery. 

    Gliding into the next piece is a track from South London artist Ego Ella May who recently released her debut LP, ‘So Far’, on Tru Thoughts. It blends neo-soul, contemporary jazz compositions with sultry soul vocals, intertwined with Hip Hop beats and electronic production.

    Highlighting the track ‘Kombisse’ by Bozambo which features on ‘The Original Sound of Burkina Faso’ compilation on Mr Bongo. The collection features songs that pay tribute to a truly golden age of music; touching on folk, funk, blues, Highlife, disco, psyche, Latin, rock and soul. Burkina Faso may be one of the least well-known parts of West Africa but it has a deep history and musical pedigree. A few years before President Thomas Sankara changed his country’s name from Upper Volta to its current one, a new sound emerged to soundtrack a cultural revolution. 

    Karim Ziad is an Algerian jazz drummer, percussionist, who also sings, plays guitar and gimbri (a three-stringed plucked lute originating in West Africa, but now traditional in Moroccan and Algerian music). The chanting on his track Sandiya sets things up nicely for a track ‘Alethia’ by newcomer O’Flynn who has just released his self-titled debut LP on Ninja Tune. 

    These are just some of the highlights in a musical journey that spans across continents, generations and genres…


    ROOTS VOLUME XIII

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts returns, taking us on another eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa

    There’s so much to talk about with this playlist - it has been designed to be equally alluring as challenging, showcasing alternative music that has slipped under the radar of mass appeal, but still has an indirect impact on modern music. A melting pot of hip hop, jazz, cumbia, rock, psychedelic, funk, house, folk and highlife stretching the corners of the globe from Japan to Columbia.

    We open with a track lifted from the recent fifth album by the nine-piece instrumental collective from Amsterdam, Jungle by Night! They fuse krautrock, dance, jazz and afrobeat together, resulting in something which is the perfect way to start the Roots playlist. They are a danceable and energetic act - definitely worth trying to see them live. 

    An artist worth keeping an eye on is Cameroonian singer Blick Bassy. His track Kiki was used to launch the iPhone 6 in 2015, and he returns with a new album, 1958. This album has been dedicated to the memory of Ruben Um Nyobé, the anti-colonialist leader of the Popular Union of Cameroon (UPC), who was shot dead by French troops on 13th September 1958.  The featured track Woñi, focuses on Bassy’s soulful, sonorous voice; a voice that is gently elevated by subtle guitar riffs, a reflective melancholy trombone and a cheeky trumpet. 

    Bibio is back with his blend of electronic, folk, hip-hop, and rock music with an adventurous outlook and atmospheric production values - I’ve selected the track Old Graffiti from his brand new album Ribbons. 

    Yasuaki Shimizu’s Kakashi, from Japan released in 1982 sounds like up upfront track blending jazz and electronics, but was very rare until 2017 Nippon Columbia/Jet Set released this first ever pressing outside of Japan. 

    How was Jack Jacobs’ I Believe It’s Alright not a hit in 1971?! Melodies International have just re-issued it - a truly uplifting song!

    I Love You - East of Underground. With only a handful of original copies known to exist, East Of Underground was reissued for the first time ever by Wax Poetics Records in 2007. The song I Love You was still relatively unknown until 21 Savage sampled it on his latest A Lot. This track highlights how the culture of sourcing and unearthing rarities can have a huge impact on modern commercial music. 

    Justin Hinds & The Dominoes, Tommy McCook & His Skatalites ‎– Over The River. The producer of this record, Duke Reid, was one of the founding fathers of the Jamaican music business, perhaps second in importance only to his chief rival, Clement "Coxsone" Dodd, both as a record producer and entrepreneur. Much like Dodd, Reid started his career in music as a DJ, then a sound system owner, then a label head (most notably of Trojan and Treasure Isle), a highly accomplished producer who masterminded some of the greatest Jamaican music of the '60s. 

    Fans of Jimi Hendrix should go straight to Living in the Ghetto, by Purple Image. How has this track escaped the public consciousness?

    With a rip-roaring harmonica in the first half of the track, Fear Itself by Crawling King Snake is a blues song that has been recorded by numerous blues and other artists - it is believed to have originated as a Delta blues in the 1920s. 

    Probably the farthest out any children's record ever got, Stark Reality Discovers Hoagy Carmichael's Music Shop descended on unwitting preteens in 1970, thanks to Boston's public television station WGBH and one of its producers, Hoagy Bix Carmichael. An unlikely DJ favourite, Stark Reality finally made it from dust to digital in 2002 with a track on the Stones Throw compilation Jukebox 45's. A full album reissue followed one year later, titled Now, and the deluxe treatment (Acting, Thinking, Feeling: The Complete Works 1968-1978) appeared on Now-Again ten years later. 

    Up-and-coming artist India Jordan’s track DNT STP MY LV is on here - she plays a gig this week Thursday May 2nd at Rye Wax in Peckham, definitely worth checking out if you’re in London. 

    We close on Yos Olarang, a Cambodian garage rock musician, and a leading figure in that country's rock scene of the ‘60s and ‘70s. He is presumed to have been killed during the Cambodian genocide that took place under the Khmer Rouge between 1975 and 1979. Aularong was regarded as an original artist, incorporating elements of soul, funk, and rock into his songs.

    These are just some of the highlights in what I hope is an enjoyable musical journey.



    ROOTS VOLUME XII

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts returns, taking us on another eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa

    Roots Volume XII should create a sense of discovery and surprise. A real concoction and melting pot of music from many eras and genres from Zamrock, rock, dream pop, hip-hop, boogaloo, soul, jazz, bossa, psychedelia, afrobeat, reggae - so hopefully there is something for everyone. 

    There are so many stories behind each track that they almost all deserve something more in-depth, but in this digital age of low attention spans I’ve honed in on half a dozen or so. 

    Some of the playlist goes back to the '50s, is inspired by the '30s then there’s a dose of recent upfront sounds spanning across the continents and joining the dots between Japan, Zambia, Togo, Israel, Brazil, US, UK, France and more...

    We start off with a belter from the '50s. Sandy Nelson - ‘Big Noise From Winnetka’ was originally a B-side on the single ‘The Drum Party’. The track is a cover originally written by Bob Haggart and Ray Bauduc in 1938 - it’s also worth checking that out for sure! The drums in both pieces are ripe for sampling - in fact Jurassic 5 have done this to great effect on the track ‘Swing Set’.

    Continuing an uptempo tip we go into the funky and danceable '70s-inspired ‘Anniversaries’ by Vaudou Game which oozes the funk of James Brown. 

    Chiemi Eri - unknown to the rest of the world but a popular singer and actress in Japan - acted in more than 50 films, as well as many theatre plays. She definitely made huge impact in the cultural aesthetic of post-war Japan. Her track ‘Okosa-Bushi’ is a concoction of traditional Japanese Min'yō music, swing and mambo.  

    As the journey continues we arrive in Zambia in the '70s. ‘History of Man’, reissued on label Now Again, is a Zamrock lo-fi, fuzzed-out Stooges and Velvet Underground-inspired rock track. This dovetails in nicely into ‘Grand Funk Railroad’ - a hard rock band heavily influenced by Motown and R&B which is what gives their music such an infectious groove. The track ‘Got This On The Move’ should be considered alongside the best of Led Zeppelin or Black Sabbath's music. 

    Staying with hard-edged drums we arrive in 2018 with Dana Murray and his piece ‘The System’. I don’t know how, but this track still has under 1000 views on Spotify! Nonetheless the track challenges institutionalised racism and sexism. 

    With jazz flourishing in 2019, it only makes sense to highlight Theon Cross an extraordinary and highly talented tuba player. The energy in the track ‘Activate’ is pure fire! 

    Taking things down a level is a piece by up-and-coming hip-hop artist Deem Spencer - this guy is one to watch over the next few years.

    Sir Was ‘In The Midst’ follows with an atmospheric genre fusion of indie rock and hip-hop vocals, that has somehow slipped off the radar. 

    The atmospheric tones continue with a 2019 release from French singer Munya. A classically trained pianist and student of Jazz, she delivers a delightful psychedelic dream-pop song entitled ‘Benjamin’.

    I’ve included a previously unreleased demo recording of Prince’s ‘17 Days’. It was recorded in one take with just a microphone and piano. The track was eventually re-recorded and ended up as a funk tune, but it's nice to hear the original idea in a stripped-back form. 

    Key And Cleary ‎– ‘I’m A Man’ - another rare piece that has just been reissued on the label Now Again (I promise I haven’t received any brown envelope). It’s a lo-fi unique soulful piece with a drum machine and bluesy guitar. The track is lifted off the ‘Love Is The Way’ compilation which features rare 7" singles and previously unreleased tracks. This album features recordings spanning from 1970 until the mid 1980s.

    There are so many more to mention, but I will let the music do the talking in this seemingly endless journey of timeless music that has gone under the radar of the many!


    ROOTS VOLUME XI

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts returns, taking us on another eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa

    Roots aims to shine a spotlight on music from around the globe that may not have had the exposure it deserves.

    This eleventh list joins the dots between punk, reggae, funk, soul, hip hop, jazz, bossa and Turkish disco. Highlights include a ferocious punk track from one of the first punk groups to emerge, The Pop Group, which sound like the antithesis to pop!


    Continuing the punk vibe, there is a piece recorded in 1977 from an Italian band, Chrisma. An obscure band but one that was still worthy of Hans Zimmer’s keys on their third album. 


    This all sits side by side of fresh music from Anderson .Paak, Harvey Sutherland and friend of Adelphoi, Rosie Lowe.


    Hope you enjoy the journey!

    ROOTS VOLUME X

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts returns for the tenth in the Roots playlist series, taking us on another eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa

    Roots X aims to shine a spotlight on music from around the globe that may not have had the exposure it deserves.

    For our tenth in the series, this is a special extended playlist... There are so many highlights in this one - where do I start? 

    We kick off with Muyei Power - unknown outside of Sierra Leone, but one of the country's biggest bands. 

    I’ve tried not to go too obscure, so I've thrown in some LL Cool J; the piece from 1990 is one of his lesser-known tracks, but still highly influential and you can clearly hear its influence on N.E.R.D’s music. I've also included Pomo’s recent tasteful remix of Daryl Hall & John Oates ‘I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do), which seems to have gone under the radar. It stays true to the original but brings that fresh Kaytranda-esque swing to the groove. Link Wray may not be a household name in the Rock ’n’ Roll scene, but his influence must not be under-estimated! In a nutshell, he was one of the first to use the power chord in rock n roll. Pete Townshend said "He is the king; if it hadn’t been for Link Wray and 'Rumble’, I would have never picked up a guitar.". 

    Another highlight for me is The Cornelius Brothers and Sister Rose's 'Too Late To Turn Back Now', a very under-exposed soul track until now, as it features in such a beautifuly crafted moment in the BlackkKlansman film. 

    The playlist aims to build a bridge across Rhumba, Hip Hop, Trap, Jazz, Footwork, Post Punk, Soul, African Disco, Highlife, Rock n Roll, Reggae, Gospel and make the world feel like a smaller place. Enjoy. 



    ROOTS VOLUME IX

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts returns, taking us on another eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa

    Taking inspiration from this summer's heatwave, I have curated the Roots playlist with an upbeat tone to be enjoyed in the sunshine with friends and family. This playlist goes to the outer limits of Spotify's ever-growing database of 10 million tracks; part of the goal with the Roots playlist series is to showcase music that got away or was never released until recently. Black Beauty, the never-before-released masterpiece by Arthur Lee's legendary band LOVE, was the follow up album to the timeless Changes. The track Midnight Sun, originally recorded in 1973, sounds like something Hendrix could have written.

    Another track worth checking is Marco Bosco - Madeira II (Mãe Terra). Up until recently, it was only available on vinyl with copies going for over £100! Now thanks to labels like Music From Memory it's available on Spotify for all to enjoy!

    The playlist covers music from the last 50-60 years, and - without it sounding too disjointed and chaotic - is a seamless fusion of funk, boogie, house, hip hop, jazz, rock, reggae, samba, footwork, drum and bass and much more…




    ROOTS VOLUME VIII

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts takes us on an eclectic journey of old, new, overlooked and perhaps lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa

    Some of the music on this playlist is indicative of the labels whose output consists of re-issuing forgotten, often undiscovered or should-have-been classics. Labels such as Light In The Attic, Numero Uno and Luv N’ Haight, Analog Africa, Music From Memory to name a few are just some of the labels dedicated to re-issuing quality overlooked material.

    There are many reasons why a lot of music has been overlooked. The award-winning film 'Searching for Sugar Man' certainly illustrates how an artist can be overlooked, even when the talent is up there with such greats as Bob Dylan. 

    The playlist captures a snapshot of the vibes and music on the fringes, from clubs and bars in London, such as Total Refreshment Centre, Canavan Club, Spiritland and Brilliant Corners. 

    As this playlist is not only retrospective there is a sprinkling of new tracks, such as Abstract Orchestra's cover of the late J Dilla’s 'Two Can Win', and Shabazz Palaces, 'Shine A Light'.

    As leftfield as the playlist is, with the coverage of diversity from countries such as Brazil, Indonesia, Turkey, Nigeria, Madagascar, Thailand and beyond…hopefully there is something for everyone. 

    There does seem to be a limit with Spotify’s algorithms using the "Recommended Songs" feature, but with the diversity of the selection it should give the listener a chance to explore a journey of an almost seemingly endless ream of songs beyond this playlist.



    ROOTS VOLUME VII

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts takes us on an eclectic journey of old and new, overlooked and perhaps lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa

    When making a playlist, it’s always tempting to go more obscure as there is so much great music that never gets a proper airing. The size of Spotify’s library certainly forces the issue to a degree. 

    This playlist does feature artists that are well known, such as The Clash, but here we showcase an unexpected Hip Hop track they collaborated on with Futura 2000 in 1982.

    Another surprise is Karen Dalton’s Same Old Man, AKA "folk music's answer to Billie Holiday," which has a bluesy undertone to the track, produced by Harvey Brooks who played bass on Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited and Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew.

    Part of the aim of these playlists is to also highlight black music’s contribution to the medium, and a great example is Cola Bottle Baby sampled by Daft Punk on Harder, Faster, Stronger. 

    A new tune not to miss a Trap-n-B style track from Kintaro, former keyboardist of The Internet and brother of Thundercat.

    Enjoy the journey!


    ROOTS VOLUME VI

    Adelphoi Music's Jonathan Watts takes us on an eclectic journey of old and new, overlooked and perhaps lesser known tracks that have musical roots in Africa. From the cosmic sounds of Sun Ra to a lesser known Prince track The Ballad of Dorothy Parker, there's sure to be something here to tickle your fancy.


    ROOTS VOLUME V

    Adelphoi Music's very own Jonathan Watts is back with his famous Roots series and how time has flown - we've reached #5! This edition is a journey from the unfamiliar, forgotten, or recently discovered, to the most upfront sounds of now, all with the common theme of being rooted in Africa.

    The playlist is curated so that it can be listened to from beginning to end, with genres spanning across Funk & Soul, Boogie, Afro-Beat, Jazz, Electro, and Footwork.

    Jonathan Watts comments: "While Roots Vol 5 is not as obscure as its predecessors - as it features artists many will be familiar with such as James Brown and DJ Shadow. But in this instance, we delve deeper into James Brown’s catalogue picking out an overlooked gem and showcasing an upfront Footwork remix of a well known DJ Shadow track.

    "Some other interesting highlights come from Saada Bonaire, a female duo, straight off the catwalk in 1982 who were pulled in to record in Kraftwerk's studio in Cologne. Their recordings have being laying dormant for over 30 years until now! The track “You Could Be More As You Are", lifted from their self-titled LP is an interesting blend of Electronica, Funk and Turkish folk! Stay tuned! And towards the end of the journey is a masterpiece from Jean-Luc Ponty, originally recorded in 1983.

    "So sit back relax and let the music do the talking."


    ROOTS VOLUME IV

    Our Roots series continues, showcasing an eclectic range of music from across the globe, the ongoing theme being rooted in Africa. The playlist spans many different eras and generations. Old, new, unfamiliar or forgotten gems from Brazil, Thailand, India, USA and even Japan.


    ROOTS VOLUME III

    Whilst this selection of tunes boasts an all star line up of Kendrick Lamar, Kaytranada, Parliament, Tribe Called Quest, Chet Baker, Ryuichi Sakamoto , Nils Frahm & Elmer Bernstein, it explores an eclectic journey of old & new, overlooked and perhaps lesser known tracks.

    Some of them may challenge the perception of music rooted in African musical culture such as Nils Frahm ‘Hammers’ which has no percussive elements but the song suggests rhythm throughout. With Jazz improv being a key influence in the artist's music.

    Enjoy the journey!

    ROOTS VOLUME II

    Prep your Christmas party playlist with the help of Adelphoi music supervisor Jonathan Watts - he is back with the sequel to his Roots Volume I.

    "Continuing where we left off last time... here is a left-field selection of music rooted in Africa, old and new and stretching Spotify's library with many lesser known tunes. The selection of music aims to join the dots across Samba, Soul, Funk, Hip Hop, Drum n Bass, Footwork, Indie Rock, Techno and Ambient, capturing music from 1950 by Muddy Waters, all the way to DJ Paypal in 2015."


    ROOTS VOLUME I

    For your ears this Friday, Jonathan Watts, music supervisor at Adelphoi Music, has dished up a multi-genre spanning selection of tunes, all with one thing in common. They're all firmly nailed in the roots of blues and rhythm. Enjoy!

    "Roots Volume 1 is an eclectic left-field mix of music rooted in blues and rhythms, both old and new. The playlist spans Jazz, Funk, Hip Hop, Reggae, Beats, Footwork & Folk exposing a few hidden gems and hopefully alighting your ears with aural pleasure." Jonathan Watts